Wednesday, January 23, 2013

Vintage Thingie Thursday - Nippon Saucers


I've been on a mission to re-do the "Mom-cave" this past week - I do have a few remaining small projects, but one of the things I came across while cleaning/organizing was a set of five of these sweet little saucers. Two of the five were displayed in my grandmother's home for many decades - I'm not sure when she acquired them - and the remainder were in storage there. Two of them have some fairly noticeable flaws, and I'm now happily displaying three of them on my little restyled knick-knack shelf.


Based on the backstamp, I learned that they were a product of the Te-Oh China Company in Japan, and are examples of hand-painted Nippon ware produced between 1891-1921. 


"Nippon" is (or was) the Japanese pronunciation of that country's name. Beginning in 1891 the US's McKinley Tariff Act required that all imported products bear the name of the country of origin. So, the word "Nippon" appeared on pieces imported from Japan beginning that year. Then, in 1921, the rules were amended to state that the name of the country of origin must be stated in English. Because the name Nippon was determined to be a Japanese word, its use was dis-allowed so imports after 1921 were marked "Japan" or "made in Japan."  

Along with the Te-Oh backstamp (which was a fairly common mark found on Nippon pieces), the translucence of these tiny plates is another indicator that they are delicate, authentic Nippon.


So is the use of gold edging and the raised dots and lines on parts of the design, although much real Nippon is actually more elaborate in design. 


I am so happy to be displaying these delicate saucers - and am amazed that they could be anywhere from 92 to 122 years old! 

I'm sharing my pretty Nippon saucers at Suzanne's fabulous link party, Vintage Thingie Thursday!

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13 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Thank you so much for visiting, it's great to have you stop by! Your table this week ("Arctic Blast") table is simply stunning!

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  2. Those are absolutely gorgeous! I love old china...:)I'll have to feature my 100 year old teapot sometime! I love how you paired them with the little wooden vases/bowls! I've been redoing my craft room and can't wait to share pix!

    Vicky
    Life On Willie Mae Lane

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    1. Vicky - oh yes, please do! I would love to see the teapot, I'll keep an eye out for it on your blog!

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  3. Those are gorgeous! I can see why you have treasured them. They are so pretty in your shelf display. Happy VTT!
    Ruth

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    1. Thank you :) I was very happy to have found a way to display them where they look right at home.

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  4. The old cup & saucers like yours just works of fine art

    I love the old ones you can pick up and see through. I wonder if they were made to really use for hot tea?

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    1. I think they were, originally. But, in my reading, I learned that most if not all the old paint was lead-based. If that's the case, they'd no longer be considered food-safe. :)

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  5. You are fortunate in having these all this time. They are really treasures to keep. I like the way your are dispalying them.

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    1. Thank you, LV! I wish I had paid a little more attention to them when my grandmother was still living. I know she would have gladly told me how and when she acquired them!

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  6. Kelly - I'm so sorry I inadvertantly deleted your comment! I'm going to try to restore it below... THANK YOU for visiting! -Janet

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  7. Not only are your plates gorgeous - but I love learning a little history too!
    Kelly

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  8. NOW - Kelly - again, thanks for visiting! Glad you enjoyed the "little bit about" Nippon as well as the plates :) Here's a link to the article I was referencing, in case you'd like to hear it from a more authoritative source! :)
    http://www.journalofantiques.com/Nov07/feature.html

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